What’s in your backpack? Bringing the six categories of  risky play indoors- Melinda Walden & Ruth Lindsey

This workshop will motivate participants to incorporate the six categories of risky play and bring the outdoors in to the children’s environment whether that be a child care centre or a school classroom.

Participants will work in groups to explore the woods and outdoor spaces at the Camp to develop leadership skills, awareness of who has the potential to be an ally, and learn about ways materials can be transferred into the indoors for a whole new set of experiences.

Skills learned include;

  • developing an understanding of the elements of risky play
  • recognizing the influence of risky play on child development
  • developing advocacy skills to support children’s right to play within the program/school where you work.
  • how to look for nature allies within your workplace
  • learning to consider the indoor learning environment and how to bring the outside in

Workshop Time: Full Day Friday or Saturday Morning

  • Please note that the Saturday Morning version of this workshop will be shorter and therefore in less detail.

Group this workshop is best suited for: All

Presenter Bios:


Ruth Lindsey-Armstrong is an Early Childhood Education Instructor and has special interest in children’s rights to be active learners in all types of environments.


Ruth engages with the environmental education community to help build sustainable practices in child care programs by teaching about vermi-composting, gardening and other eco-friendly activities for Early Childhood Educators and the children they work with.




Melinda Walden has been in the Early Childhood Education field for more than 15 years.


She has been a front line ECE in a variety of childcare settings, including preschool, school-age, and nursery centres, with experience in infant and family childcare as well.  Currently Melinda is an ECE Instructor in the Workplace Program at Red River College.


Every chance she gets, she shares her passion about risky play and proudly applies her knowledge with her sons.  A a new mother she sees the value that comes with entrusting her sons to take risks. “Without risk there is no learning.” (Carl Rodgers)